Autumn term start date and news

Hi all this is just a quick note to say that the first class back at the Lam Rim Centre will be Wednesday 2nd September at 8:00 – 9:30pm. From that point all other classes will continue as normal.

Monday classes will resume on Monday 7th September at 6:30-8:00pm.

As an additional note to late Wednesday classes, a local Yoga school has now taken up the early slot on a Wednesday. Due to the nature of their class structure, and after having a conversation with the teacher, can I ask all students not enter the hall (where we practice our form) to get to the café area until 7:50pm please. This is due to it being with beginners and a portion of teaching that requires meditation and out of respect I said the school would be mindful of this.

So as the weather is variable and we’re coming towards the end of Summer when coming in to the side entrance if you come early can you please either remain downstairs, or if you can get through the Main doors to the centre go up the central stairs (equally being mindful of practitioners in the practice rooms on the ground floor), to the café? Many thanks.

As with last year both classes over a 10 week period went through and reviewed Yang Cheng-fu’s 10 essential points of practice, this term we will be doing something similar. Over a 4 week period both classes will be being introduced to and taught Dr Chi Chiang-tao’s 7 point practice of Tai Chi.

Dr Chi Chiang-tao’s 7 Point’s of Practice:

1. Full

2. Empty

3. Yin

4. Yang

5. Open

6. Closed

7. Central Equilibrium

By paring up most the of the points we will deepen our practice of the natural and correct techniques of Tai Chi and how we can develop and advance our practice and experience. The 7 point principles are essential in Tai Chi whether you want to practice just for health or martial art. A thorough understanding of them is vital to advancing to higher stages in Tai Chi practice.

Enjoy the last week before we come back to classes and as the season transforms so does our awareness to make sure our practice adapts to any changes internal or external, yet always for ours and others benefits.

See you soon

Phil and Chris

 

 

 

 

 

Song of the Essence and Application of T’ai chi Ch’uan – By Li I Yu

Posted October 12th, 2014 in Course Material, Long Form, News, Push Hands, San Sou, Short Form, Sword Form by Phil Vickery

Wu Yu-hsiang (who founded Wu Style Tai Chi) was a scholar from a wealthy and influential family who became a senior student of Yang Lu-Chan (founder of Yang style tai Chi). Wu’s most famous student was his nephew Li I Yu a formidable Tai Chi Master and a scholar who produced many manuscripts which are considered part of the canon of the tai Chi classics today. One of his most famous writing was called Song of the Essence and Application of T’ai chi Ch’uan. Please take some time to read and absorb the highly realised teachings he recorded which will contain many familiar sayings you may have read or heard in the classes: Li I Yu

Yang Cheng Fu’s 10 Essentials Points of Taijiquan

Aswell as preparation for the Long Form classes starting back in the new year 2014, this reproduction of Yang Cheng Fu’s famous 10 essential points of Tai Chi/Taijiquan is a vital check list for all practitioners.

The school will be concentrating on one point in turn each week where we will effectively have a Yang Cheng Fu term so we can understand each point and how to develop it in our overall practice. Please note this will not replace our actual syllabus of Tai Chi merely that we can examine the essential point in the form of: a partner exercise, a standing posture, posture correction, stand alone exercise etc. It will be overlayed onto what we are already learning as a working experience of understanding the Tai Chi classics better.

Please see the reproduced translation below from Yang Cheng Fu’s chief disciple Chen Wei Ming:

YCF Ten Essentials Points of Taijiquan

List of Long Form Postures

Posted October 10th, 2011 in Long Form by Chris Hill

Here is an amended copy of the Long Form postures as taught in the Middleway School of Tai Chi: Long Form postures